Blog | WM. F. Horne & Company, PLLC

15Jun2017

Does Your Employee Misclassify You as an Independent Contractor Instead of as an Employee?

contractor vs employee

 

Article Highlights

  • Employee
  • Independent Contractor
  • Behavioral Control
  • Financial Control
  • Relationship
  • Request For IRS Determination
  • Self-Employment Tax

It is not uncommon for employers to misclassify employees as independent contractors, either to intentionally avoid their withholding and tax responsibilities or because they are not aware of the laws regarding the issue. If your employer reports your income on a Form 1099 (as opposed to a W-2), you are being treated as an independent contractor, not as an employee. This can have significant ramifications in terms of how much you have to pay in income, Social Security, and Medicare taxes.

The general distinction, of course, is that an employee is an individual who works under the direction and control of an employer, and an independent contractor is a business owner or contractor who provides services to other businesses.

To determine whether a worker is an independent contractor or an employee, the IRS examines the relationship between the worker and the business and considers all evidence regarding control and independence. This evidence falls into the following three categories:

(1) Behavioral control covers whether the business has the right to direct or control how the work is done through instructions, training, or other means. Employees are generally given instructions on when and where to work, what tools to use, where to purchase supplies, what order to follow, and so on.

(2) Financial control covers whether the business has the right to control the financial and business aspects of the worker’s job. This includes the extent to which the worker has unreimbursed business expenses; the extent of his or her investment in the facilities being used; the extent to which his or her services are made available to the relevant market; how he or she is paid; and the extent to which he or she can realize a profit or incur a loss.

(3) Type of relationship includes any written contracts that describe the relationship the parties intended to create; the extent to which the worker is available to perform services for other, similar businesses; whether the business provides the worker with employee-type benefits, such as insurance, a pension plan, vacation pay, or sick pay; the permanency of the relationship; and the extent to which the worker’s services are a key aspect of the company’s regular business.

If you have questions about being misclassified as an independent contractor, please give our office a call.

 

 

  • 15 Jun, 2017
  • Jacqueline Cran
  • 0 Comments

Share This Story

Categories

Comments