Blog | WM. F. Horne & Company, PLLC

13Oct2016

Looking for Ways to Maximize Your Retirement Contributions?

 

retirment.blog

 

Article Highlights:

  • Key Benefits
  • Solo 401(k) Contributions
  • Discretionary Funding
  • Where Deducted
  • Deadlines
  • Roth Option

If you are a sole proprietor with no full-time employees other than yourself and/or your spouse, and you are seeking to maximize your retirement plan contributions, a Solo 401(k) may be right for you. The key benefits of a Solo 401(k) plan allow you to:

  • Manage your own account directly without any brokers, banks, or trust companies as middlemen.
  • Generally contribute larger amounts, approximately equal to the 401(k) and profit-sharing amounts combined.
  • Legally avoid the unrelated business income tax (UBIT) that would apply to certain self-directed IRA transactions.
  • Make Roth contributions to the 401(k) element (not the profit-sharing part) of the plan, regardless of the AGI limitations that apply to regular Roth contributions.
  • Transfer existing retirement funds into the Solo 401(k).
  • Direct your investments with absolutely no restrictions on investment choices (including real estate, private companies, foreign assets, precious metals, etc.).

Solo 401(k) Contributions

The maximum annual contribution to a Solo 401(k) for 2016 is $53,000 but not exceeding 100% of compensation. The Solo 401(k) contribution consists of two parts: (1) a profit-sharing contribution of up to 20% of net self-employment income for unincorporated businesses or 25% of W-2 income for incorporated businesses and (2) a salary-deferral contribution (same as the 401(k)) of as much as 100% of the first $18,000 ($24,000 if age 50 or over) of the remaining compensation after the profit-sharing contribution, as a tax-deductible contribution.

Given sufficient income, a self-employed individual and spouse (assuming the spouse is employed in the same business) may contribute, for 2016, up to $106,000 combined. Because of the way the contribution is calculated, a larger contribution can usually be made into a Solo 401(k) than to a Keogh or SEP IRA at the same income level.

Discretionary Funding

The funding of the Solo 401(k) plan is completely discretionary and flexible every year. Funding can be increased, decreased, or skipped entirely, if necessary.

Where Deducted

If your business is organized as a Subchapter S or C corporation, or LLC electing to be taxed as a corporation, then you are an employee of the business, so the salary-deferral contribution reduces your personal W-2 earnings and the profit-sharing contribution is deducted as a business expense.

For a sole proprietorship, a partnership, or an LLC taxed as a sole proprietorship, the owner’s salary-deferral and profit-sharing contributions are deductible only from personal income (i.e., on page 1 of Form 1040, as an adjustment to gross income), and not as an expense of the business.

Deadlines

The deadline for establishing a Solo 401(k) is December 31st for an individual or the fiscal year end for corporations. For unincorporated businesses, the deadline for making the contributions is the regular April income tax filing due date plus extensions. For incorporated businesses, the deadline is 15 days after the close of the fiscal year.

Roth Option

The 401(k) portion of the contribution can be designated as a non-deductible qualified Roth contribution, provided the plan document permits Roth contributions.

If you think a Solo 401(k) might be right for you, please call our office for further details and to determine if your particular circumstances permit you have and whether you will benefit from a Solo 401(k).

  • 13 Oct, 2016
  • Jacqueline Cran
  • 0 Comments

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